Monthly Archives: August 2016

You May Have a Gluten Allergy

unduhan-55So, you’re feeling tired and headachy, and your digestive system is off (and has been for what seems like forever). Maybe you have some other symptoms: a rash, dandruff, a feeling that you’re operating in a depressed and disorganized manner, or are just in a fog. And maybe you’ve been trying to get pregnant, but it’s not working …and you have no idea why.

You’ve heard about gluten and know that lots of people are going gluten-free, and you start to wonder: Could I have a gluten allergy, too?

Well, maybe. There are actually five different kinds of gluten allergies, and each has its own set of signs and symptoms. Still, there’s plenty of overlap between these five conditions, and many of their symptoms involve the types of sometimes vague problems listed above: digestive issues, skin issues, and neurological issues.

Of course, not everyone with these symptoms will have a gluten allergy — there are plenty of other possible causes for each. But the possibility is worth considering if you and your physician can’t identify other potential reasons for your problems. Suffering from one or more of these nine signs could indicate that you may have a gluten allergy and should have some testing done, or that you should talk to your doctor about a trial of the gluten-free diet.

Not everyone with a gluten-related issue suffers from digestive problems, but enough people do have this issue to make it number one on our list.

These “problems” can involve diarrhea, constipation, reflux, or simply abdominal pain, and they’re frequently seen when you have one of the two most common types of gluten allergy: celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

In some cases, people who’ve been diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome actually have a form of gluten allergy, and when they stop eating gluten, their IBS diminishes or goes away entirely.

Do you need to have digestive symptoms to have a gluten allergy? Nope, not at all — in fact, lots of people have one of the other issues on our list as their primary symptom, and report having cast iron stomachs. But if you do have dysfunctional digestion, it’s possible that gluten is the cause.

Cheeses For Your Health

While cheese can be high in saturated fat and salt, it contains many essential nutrients like calcium and protein. There are now many options on the market that offer low-fat and low-sodium versions of your favorites. We’ll help you take a closer look at whether these alternatives can be part of a healthy diet and what varieties of cheese are the healthiest.

Check out the slideshow above to discover the best and worst cheeses to buy.

Drink at least 10 to 12 glasses of water per day. Cut out all non-diet soft drinks, juice, milk, sweetened iced tea and alcohol. These drinks are empty calories you consume, since they are highly caloric and do not offer much nutritional value. If more variety is needed, diet soda, unsweetened tea and black coffee are also allowable low-calorie options.

When most people go out to eat, they expect an establishment to prepare their food in a manner that’s representative of the restaurant’s reputation and price point. If you pay $20 or $30 for a meal, you probably expect it to be prepared carefully and with quality ingredients, whereas if you pay three bucks for a meal, you may expect a few shortcuts here and there. But, at the end of the day, even if restaurants microwave nacho cheese sauce or prepare a few ingredients in advance, the meal should still be delicious (and safe) — no matter how much it costs.

But if you have any experience working in the restaurant business, you know that restaurants — as profit-generating businesses — place a great deal of effort into reducing their costs. And, some of these costreduction tactics are not exactly, well, appetizing to say the least.