Monthly Archives: July 2016

Men prefer larger women

Think thin women are your “type,” men?

That may change as your stress levels rise.

A new study from the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, published in the journal Ethology, found that men undergoing high levels of stress find heavier women more attractive than their less-stressed cohort does.

Researchers at the university polled men going through grueling army cadet training, as well as those whose environments were unchanged and largely stress-free.

The study found that as the cadets’ stress level increased, they were more likely to rate heavier female faces highly. This is likely because women who appear heavier are better able to survive tough times — like a famine or war — and continue to reproduce, the study authors posit.

In documents published this week, inspectors found that a fifth of the water in the Yangtze’s feeder rivers in one province was unusable, and thousands of tonnes of raw sewage were being deposited into one river in northeastern Ningxia each day.

Worried about unrest, China launched its war on pollution in 2014, vowing to reverse the damage done to its skies, rivers and soil by more than three decades of breakneck industrial growth.

Texas heart surgeon

Dr. Denton Cooley, a Texas surgeon who performed some of the earliest heart transplants and implanted the world’s first artificial heart, has died.

Linden Emerson, a spokeswoman for the Texas Heart Institute in Houston, says Cooley died on Friday. He was 96.

In 1969, Cooley implanted the world’s first artificial heart as a temporary measure while a heart transplant was arranged. A year earlier, he had performed the first successful human heart transplant in the U.S.

Cooley contributed to the development of techniques to repair and replace diseased heart valves and was renowned for operations to correct congenital heart problems in infants and children.

Before Kybella became available, doctors offered liposuction or a direct incision as options for double chin improvement, but both are invasive, carry more risks and side effects and include significant downtime.

Kybella is a more benign option, though it does involve injections and possible side effects. In clinical trials, 4.3 percent of participants experienced temporary nerve paralysis as a side effect.

If the solution is injected superficially, the hair follicles can be damaged and result in bald areas, or a skin sore that will heal. Numbness can last up to six weeks.

Some patients may also feel as though they have difficulty swallowing or even breathing after the treatment, but it’s a mental perception, not a physical side effect, Russo said.

What’s most attractive to men about Kybella is that there is little to no downtime before they can resume their normal activities.

“They want to come in, get it done and be back to work the next day,” Burgdorf said.

Microphone from autistic boy

A West Virginia teacher is facing criticism after grabbing a microphone from an autistic boy during a Thanksgiving Day-themed play.

Fox 5 New York reported a video of the incident is starting to go viral, garnering more than 103,000 views on YouTube since Amanda Riddle, the boy’s mother, posted it. The video shows children in costumes approach the microphone on stage to thank the audience and wish them a happy Thanksgiving. But when it comes time for Caleb Riddle, 6, to speak, a woman is seen yanking the mic from its stand, the news station reported.

“I left in tears because one teacher Mrs. Linsey I think her name is grabbed the microphone from Caleb and in a mean way,” Riddle wrote on YouTube with the video, which she titled “Mean Teacher.” “My son is a little different I know this but his heart is so big and he loves everyone. What does it matter if he wanted to say gobble gobble he was the turkey after all. I’m sick of kids that are not considered ‘normal’ be treated the way they are.”

FoxNews.com did not verify the school teacher’s name.

Dr. Mark Manchin, of the boy’s school district, told 5 News the teacher didn’t intend to be malicious and that “a mistake was made.”

“This teacher, as all of our teachers, truly care about these young boys and girls,” Manchin told 5 News. “The program was over, at least as I understand, and the teacher had taken the microphone.”

He added the teacher “feels very bad” about the incident.

Parts of China water quality

China is making progress in battling the damaging smog that can shroud its big cities, but in many areas – from parts of the giant Yangtze river to the coalfields of Inner Mongolia – its water pollution is getting worse.

Despite commitments to crack down on polluters, the quality of water in rivers, lakes and reservoirs in several regions has deteriorated significantly, according to inspection teams reporting back to the Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP).

In documents published this week, inspectors found that a fifth of the water in the Yangtze’s feeder rivers in one province was unusable, and thousands of tonnes of raw sewage were being deposited into one river in northeastern Ningxia each day.

Worried about unrest, China launched its war on pollution in 2014, vowing to reverse the damage done to its skies, rivers and soil by more than three decades of breakneck industrial growth.

“We still have a lot of work to do,” vice-minister Zhao Yingmin said at a press briefing on Friday.

“First, I’d say the point of inspections is to discover problems, and indeed we discovered in some places water quality has gotten significantly worse,” he said, noting, though, that the overall situation was improving.

Over the first nine months of this year, 70.3 percent of samples taken from 1,922 surface water sites around China could be used as drinking water, up 4 percentage points from a year ago, Zhao said.

TIGHT SUPPLY

China has long been worried about a water supply bottleneck that could jeopardize future economic development. Per capita supplies are less than a third of the global average.

A survey published by the MEP last year showed that nearly two thirds of underground water and a third of surface water was unsuitable for human contact, with much of it contaminated by fertilizer run-offs, heavy metals and untreated sewage.

China’s priority, though, has been air pollution, especially in industrialized regions like Beijing and Hebei, and it said this week that concentrations of harmful small particles, known as PM2.5, fell 12.5 percent in January-October.

“With air, you stop pollution at the source, and the blue skies come back instantly,” said Ma Jun, director of the Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs, which monitors Chinese water pollution.

“For water, you can stop pollution at the source, but you still have the polluted sediment and the soil that is going to leech into the water, and it’s going to take much longer.”